Walking Abbie B

Well, here I am.  My first morning on Bangs Island.  A place I made an attempt to visit during my practice trip last year.  The attempt was ruled out rather quickly because a strong current gripped my loaded down 14.2″ recreational kayak as soon as bow turned toward the Island.  Safety first folks.  The sea was perfectly calm but currents can be as dangerous or even more so than a wild ocean.  First rule of self-rescue, “Know when not to go out.”  My golden rule for anything.

I sit on a rock looking out over the channel toward Great Chebuege Island, remembering last night’s return trip and chuckle about my creative parking of Abbie B. She looked truly undignified.  I wonder what she said about that but maybe it’s best to leave that one alone.  Sorry, Abbie B.

Here’s the video clip taken within minutes of leaving Abbie B creatively parked.  I added a bit light for better viewing.  You will here the wind and see gentle water.  Note that  I am in a protected cove which means what is beyond has a bit more flavor. The tidal current pulling at a steep angle upwind of water movement was moderately strong. It was still a challenge to walk from the safe landing point over to camp. I was in mid-thigh to waist deep water whose incoming waves were hitting me on one side, waves rebounding off the rocky shore was shoving everything beneath the water outward, my feet stumbled over underwater rocks, while pulling Abbie B behind me. At least trying to keep her behind me. The wind, push and pull of surface water kept pushing her into me. A nudge from her bow hurt enough to motivate keen awareness of Abbie B’s location and making adjustments accordingly.

For my hiking friends, This is like walking broadside to a stiff wind above tree line at the same time a stonger wind at a 90 degree angle is driving the lower half of the body outward, while navigating through a rock garden. Use your imagination by adding the work of pulling a large hardshelled empty pack which is floating on a layer between the opposing forces with an empahsis on the upper broadside wind.  Believe me when I say that, you don’t want to get hit by the backpack.  Bruises and a bit of being beat up is the least of possible injuries. The few times Abbie B was shoved against me were just love taps from here bow. These hurt enough to keep a sharp eye on her throughout the short crossing to camp. It was a constant chore to keep her behind and off of me.

Back to my morning view, the three rafts lying just off the shore are a mystery to me.

Floating Dock

Floating Dock

They don’t like like a working floating dock;
such as the one in the harbor between
Little Chebeague and Long Island.

Click on photo for full screen to see the docks better

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve learned that these docks are owned and operated by Bangs Island Muscle Co.   “BANGS ISLAND MUSSELS are hand-raised using techniques that are meticulous and labor intensive, by design. We nurture and harvest our mussels with the utmost care, relying on our worker’s knowledgeable hands instead of powerful and damaging machines to get the job done right. The extra time and effort that we put into BANGS ISLAND MUSSELS pays off in extended shelf life and premium meat quality.”  From the Company’s about page.  Click here for more info. It is also worth checking out their Harvenst page for a map of locations and a more detailed description of what they do. Click here.  They offer a photo slide show on their home page, Click here.

The following is a gallery showing the docks, my protected home (one from surf landing point showing the length of walk and the now exposed seaweed covered rocks I walked through with Abbie Band there other is from my “private beach.”)  A photo of sky from tent floor and one of the interior of the island from my outside of tent door.  More on the latter in my next post.  * You can view the photos full screen by clicking on any one of them.

 

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About Just Jude

I grew up on a small farm in Michigan but have always felt the urge to wander and began doing so as a teenager. Since that time, I've hiked, biked and paddled in every season; not for sport, but for the journey.

Posted on April 6, 2015, in Bangs island, Casco Bay, Kayaking, Maine, Maine Coast, Photos, Solo Journeys, Twenty One Days at Sea, Videos and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Love ur articles and pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

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